Published on:

Too Much Noise in Operating Rooms Increase Surgical Errors

Some of the most costly forms of Illinois medical malpractice are surgical errors. The chances for severe consequences are high when mistakes are made while an individual’s body has been opened up. It is vital that medical professionals do all in their power to eliminate as many risks for mistakes in surgery as possible.

That is why notice is being taken of a new article in HealthDay highlighting one way that medical facilities increase the risk of mistakes: too much noise in the operating room. Specifically, new research to be published in the July issue of the British Journal of Surgery suggest that noisy operation rooms put patients at a greater risk for surgical site infections (SSIs).

The infections are then associated with longer, costlier stays at the hospital. One doctor involved in the study explained, “SSIs lead to patients spending up to 13 days longer in [the] hospital, making their stay cost up to three times as much.”

The connection between the noise and the errors was found by examining 35 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery. The investigators compared a variety of factors in the room including the noise level, size of the surgical room, and length of the procedure. Of that group six developed the infections with the noise level being the only variable that increased the risk of SSI. The researchers believe that the noise increases the stress level in the hospital room, negatively impacted the concentration of the doctors.

Our Illinois medical malpractice lawyers at Levin & Perconti know that there remains a great deal of steps that can be taken by medical facilities to improve care and limit the number of errors. It is vital that all consumers do everything in their power to encourage these medical facilities to take those steps-such as ensuring no unnecessary noise in operating rooms. Patient lives will be saved and overall healthcare costs will be lowered as fewer people are forced to spend more time and money fixing preventable medical complications.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

New Bill Seeks to Protect Patients from Hospital Acquired Infections

New Law Mandates that Infection Data be Listed on Death Certificates