Articles Tagged with Levin & Perconti

Department of Public Health Plans to Remove License from Chicago Lakeshore Hospital, Federal Funding Revoked

Without federal funding from The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and a facility license provided by the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), Chicago Lakeshore Hospital may finally pay for its continued failures in compliance by jeopardizing patient health and safety. CMS recently announced it would terminate a Medicare agreement, which provides accompanying federal funding to the psychiatric hospital formerly known as Aurora Chicago Lakeshore Hospital, and IDPH released plans to revoke the facility’s license. Both agencies cited ongoing allegations of abuse, safety violations, and deficiencies that threaten the overall wellbeing of patients as the cause.

  • Chicago Lakeshore Hospital is a private psychiatric facility located in the northside of the city.

Woman’s Estate Wins $8.1 Million For Failed Cancer Diagnosis and Wrongful Death, Represented by Levin & Perconti

In 2016, Levin & Perconti attorneys John J. Perconti, Michael F. Bonamarte IV and Daniel A. Goldfaden filed a lawsuit on behalf of the estate of a woman who should have been diagnosed with cancer when she was first X-rayed in 2013. It wasn’t until doctors at another hospital diagnosed her with stage 3 lung cancer in October 2014 that her illness was known. The delayed diagnosis caused Althea Wright’s disease to progress and go untreated. Sadly, she later died in 2015 at the age of 68. The suit was filed on behalf of Wright’s two children.

During a week-long trial in December 2019, a Cook County jury determined the estate of the deceased radiologist, Palmer Jane Blakley, MD, and the corporation tied to her closed practice must pay $8.125 million to remedy the missed cancer diagnosis. Blakley reviewed Wright’s scans, which showed a “rounded density” in her left lung, but she did not identify the mass or note any abnormality in Wright’s chart.

Legionella-Related Cases Being Investigated at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage

Becker’s Hospital Review is reporting that three individual cases of Legionnaires’ disease are being investigated at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage in Winfield, Illinois. According to the report, one individual was an inpatient at Central DuPage, while the other two had outpatient visits.

In Illinois, state and local health departments typically take the lead in investigating possible Legionella cases but may request help from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) when necessary, such as during an outbreak. In 2018, state health departments reported nearly 10,000 cases of Legionnaires’ disease, a rate which has grown by nearly nine times since 2000.

Legalized Marijuana

Patient Harm at the Hands of Impaired Clinicians

Many reports on the issue of drug and alcohol use among those in the medical profession have found that substance abuse is widespread. However, rigorous standards are in place to keep patients safe from negligently “high” doctors. But recently adding to the issue is the possible impact the legalization of sales and recreational use of marijuana in Illinois may have on a physician’s performance. Undoubtedly, some doctors and health care professionals are likely to take a personal interest in the consumption of legal pot, especially as environmental triggers and workplace stressors commonly felt by overworked medical professionals are known to drive a person toward chemical or substance dependencies.

We hope that these practitioners appreciate the boundaries related to performing the duty of care owed to their patients and that they understand some users may be incapable of fulfilling that duty and as a result – cause harm to their patients.

MRI Recommendations

Lack of Physician Compliance Identified After Radiologist Suggests Secondary Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive test used to diagnose and detect medical conditions, especially those that impact the joints, spine and soft tissues such as muscles and tendons. Once the imaging is complete, a radiologist, a doctor who is trained to review the exam images, will send a signed report to the patient’s primary care or referring physician with recommendations for diagnosis or treatment. The treating physician will then share the results with their patient and explain if a follow-up exam or further evaluation is required.

Common use for MRI is to diagnose or evaluate musculoskeletal injuries or diseases:

Struggling Hospitals

Chicago Hospitals Fall Behind in Safety and Quality Rankings

According to The Leapfrog Group’s bi-annual list of hospital grades based on hospital survey results, several Chicago hospitals received the highest grade for overall safety and quality. Still, surprisingly, some of the city’s top hospitals didn’t make this session’s cut. Leapfrog sends the survey to hospitals in which the group said about 2,100 participated. Hospitals were asked about specific measures for example related to hand hygiene, intensive care unit physician staffing, bedsores and falls, C-section rates, rates of episiotomies during childbirth, and radiation doses for pediatric patients during CT scans. Based on the feedback provided, including a review of health insurance information, the non-profit then assigned each hospital with a grade of A through F.

Illinois’ hospitals that received an A grade in the Fall 2019 report, include:

L&P - Breast Cancer Month

What If A Doctor Failed to Diagnose Your Breast Cancer?

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers estimate that medical error, including failure to diagnose, is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. And in many cases, medical conditions such as breast cancer are treatable when caught early but failing to diagnose or treat can often lead to further injury or death. With today’s greater awareness of one of the biggest killers to American women, as well as technological and diagnostic advancements, doctors should be able to detect breast cancer based on symptoms, standard age-based tests, or readily available screening methods. In many types of breast cancers, an early and correct diagnosis can make a significant difference in prognosis.

According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, some of the more common breast cancer diagnoses include:

illinois med mal lawyer

3 Things to Know Before Filing a Medical Malpractice Claim in Illinois

Medical negligence or malpractice is often the result of a professional or an institution breaching the standard of care. Illinois health systems, doctors, nurses, psychiatrists, dentists, chiropractors, and clinicians of all kinds can be responsible for a negligent act that provides the basis of a medical malpractice lawsuit. Examples of malpractice may stem from:

  • A hospital choosing to reduce staffing or hours of monitoring at medical facilities

chicago med mal lawyers

Levin & Perconti Recognized for Work on Medical Malpractice Cases 

Levin & Perconti has been selected as a finalist by The National Law Journal’s 2019 Elite Trial Lawyers Award for their work on medical malpractice cases.

NLJ’s editors and reporters reviewed more than 300 submissions from lawyers and law firms from across more than 20 categories, seeking those who demonstrated repeated success in cutting-edge work on behalf of plaintiffs over the last 18 months. The selection committee was also looking for legal services with a solid track record of client wins over the past three to five years.

veteran health care

Medical Mistake Leads to Terminal Cancer Diagnosis for Green Beret

The story of Sgt. 1st Class Rich Stayskal, as published on January 14, 2019 in Stars and Stripes, an independent news source to the U.S. military community, is tough to get through. Stayskal is a former Marine who later became a Green Beret but is now battling a terminal stage IV metastatic lung cancer. The husband and father of two says his military doctors missed a diagnosis opportunity that could have saved his life in 2017 when he first presented symptoms and a scan showed the illness.

But unlike similar malpractice claims patients can bring against the private medical community, Stayskal can’t do much because of a military rule known as the Feres doctrine. Feres prohibits military servicemembers from suing the government and is a rule that can only be changed via an act of Congress or a ruling by the Supreme Court. The rule, which has been upheld for more than 68 years, was meant to maintain a “no-fault” compensation system in the military where combat-related deaths and injuries are possible.

Lawyer Monthly - Legal Awards Winner
The National Trial Lawyers
Elder Care Matters Alliance
American Association for Justice
Fellow Litigation Counsel of America
Super Lawyers