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mistakes in elective surgery and outpatient services

As Elective Surgeries and Outpatient Procedures Resume, Medical Mistakes Will Return

Most elective surgeries and non-emergent outpatient visits have been put on hold since mid-March, when the Illinois Department of Public Health recommended canceling these procedures in response to preventing the potential exposure to coronavirus. As of May, many Illinois hospitals have returned to scheduling and performing elective surgeries and procedures as officials say the COVID-19 curve is bending.

Most hospitals are starting with outpatient procedures before in-patient procedures are considered and are required to follow federal and state recommendations to determine the necessity of the surgery before it’s approved. A patient will then have a choice whether to proceed with the surgery. If a hospital system decides to reopen for these procedures and expand care, they should have a plan in place that will exceed expectations of infectious disease safety and minimize any risk of medical error.

covid-19 changes to medicare

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has taken over the American healthcare system as a response to the 2019 Novel Coronavirus pandemic by creating new rules and waivers of pre-coronavirus operations related to Medicare. CMS says the swift changes will help “local hospitals and health systems have the capacity to absorb and effectively manage potential surges of COVID-19 patients. … flexibilities to permit hospitals and healthcare systems to act as coordinators of healthcare delivery in their areas.”

For many hospitals, Medicare and Medicaid are the single largest payers for healthcare, leaving facilities heavily reliant on receiving reimbursement from the programs to stay afloat financially, with patients waiting in the wings. The team at Levin & Perconti hopes these waivers may help solve this long-standing problem and provide broader access to care in such a troubling time.

This is a brief overview of the new directives from CMS related to COVID-19 care.

Medical Groups Race to Identify COVID-19 Risks to Mom and Baby

Many expectant parents are now facing a new reality and uncertainty about the health care risks related to coronavirus exposure. So far, According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, current data on COVID-19 does not suggest pregnant women are at greater risk of getting the virus but similar to other respiratory infections, they are at higher risk of harm due to a slightly compromised immune system caused by pregnancy. A respiratory infection that is left undiagnosed or untreated can lead to more injury and damage to a mother and her baby.

Doctors Are Changing Prenatal Care

In a feature article titled, Pregnant in a time of coronavirus—the changing risks and what you need to know and published by The Conversation, the author suggests prenatal care in a time of coronavirus will continue to look much different in the months ahead.

how does coronavirus spread

Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for 2020

Each year, the nonprofit ECRI Institute puts out a “Top 10 Patient Safety Concern Executive Brief” aimed to bring a heightened awareness for a better continuum of care and stronger accountability for U.S. health care systems. The annual top 10 report ranks patient safety concerns in all health care settings and designed to help organizations identify dangerous patient safety challenges and offers suggestions and resources for addressing them.

The list for 2020 includes:

coronavirus hospital concerns

Illinois Hospitals and Coronavirus Disease Concerns

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) continues to closely monitor an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus (named COVID-19) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China that has since infected thousands of people in several international locations. Some scientific research has provided estimates that each infected person could spread the virus to as many as 3.5 people without effective containment measures. With new warnings from the CDC alarming Americans to brace for the likelihood that the coronavirus will spread to U.S. communities like Chicago, it is critical hospitals and local health departments are prepared.

As of February 24, 2020, two coronavirus cases have been detected and treated in the state of Illinois. CBS Chicago reported that a husband and wife couple in their 60s were being treated for the virus at St. Alexius Hospital in Hoffman Estates. The woman had recently returned from Wuhan. Her husband, who had not been in China, was also diagnosed with the virus. This was the first known case of human-to-human transmission of coronavirus in the U.S. In Illinois, 68 individuals have been tested for the virus, with the elderly couple being the only two positive cases reported at this time.

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