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Malpractice Payouts Decreasing for Physician Errors

National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), an entity created by Congress and run by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, has compiled a list of state rankings comparing the number of payouts for physician errors based on the state population. At number 20, Illinois falls right in the middle with 294 payouts, or 1 payment for every 43,741 people residing in our state.  At the top of the list is New York, with 8,875 payments for physician errors, or 1 for every 37,466 residents. The state with the fewest payments for physician error based on the number of residents was Wisconsin, with 1 payment for every 199,012 people.

Data Shows Others Relying on Faulty Evidence
The most striking fact to come from the data collected by NPDB is that the number of payments for physician errors has decreased as a whole every single year from 2001 to 2015 (2016 data is not yet available). This evidence stands in stark contrast to the claim made by top Republican lawmakers that tort reform (putting caps on damages awarded to those injured by physician error and other acts of negligence) is necessary to reducing healthcare costs for Americans. Tort reform advocates frequently argue that the number and dollar amount of medical malpractice payouts are increasing, forcing insurers to charge physicians and healthcare organizations more for their malpractice premiums. Tort reformers conclude that to cover these larger premiums, healthcare organizations must pass the cost onto the patient through higher costs for treatment. Thankfully, we now have even more hard evidence to support the belief that limiting the right to compensation by injured persons should not be based on the false idea that it will create rising healthcare costs.